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It is estimated that total health and long-term care costs for persons with Alzheimer’s and other dementias in the United States will total $259 billion in 2017, more than two-thirds of which is expected to be covered by public sources such as Medicare and Medicaid.

 That’s the latest from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Data for 2017 is projected, from CDC analysis of mortality data for 1999–2014, as provided by the National Vital Statistics System and based on information from all resident death certificates filed in the 50 states and the District of Columbia.

“Given the increasing number of Alzheimer’s deaths and persons with Alzheimer’s dying at home, there is a growing number of caregivers who likely can benefit from interventions like education, respite care, and home health assistance,” CDC notes.

 

Percentage of Deaths In Home Increased

A total of 93,541 Alzheimer’s deaths occurred in the United States in 2014 at an age-adjusted (to the 2000 standard population) rate of 25.4 deaths per 100,000 population, a 54.5% increase compared with the 1999 rate of 16.5 deaths per 100,000. Most deaths occurred in a nursing home or long-term care facility. The percentage of Alzheimer’s decedents who died in a medical facility (e.g., hospital) declined from 14.7% in 1999 to 6.6% in 2014, whereas the percentage who died at home increased from 13.9% in 1999 to 24.9% in 2014.

“Given the increasing number of Alzheimer’s deaths and persons with Alzheimer’s dying at home, there is a growing number of caregivers who likely can benefit from interventions like education, respite care, and home health assistance,” CDC notes. “Such interventions,” which would also include case management, “can lessen the burden of caregiving and can improve the care received by persons with Alzheimer’s.”

Increases in the mortality rate for Alzheimer’s might be the result of corresponding decreases in mortality rates for competing causes of death, including cardiovascular disease and stroke, according to CDC.

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